An early autumn evening walk around Langsett (Part Three)

The Sunday before last, I returned from the wedding of two friends to one of those perfect autumn afternoons. I couldn’t a waste a beauty like that so, spurred on by the best display of mushrooms on our lawn that I can remember, I set off around Langsett Reservoir anticipating a real smörgåsbord of fungi. I wasn’t disappointed!

So Yorkshire Water are clearfelling a lot of conifers from the North America Plantation on the south-west side of Langsett Reservoir.


[From one of Yorkshire Water’s information boards at Langsett, under the title ‘Reversing Woodland Bird Decline – East Midlands Woodland Bird Project’:]

Planted in 1962, comprising approximately 25 hectares of coniferous woodland, the North America plantation including Delf Edge and Mauk Royd is being managed to help native woodland birds.

With the help of the Forestry Commission and the RSPB we’re restructuring the woodland to create habitats ideal for nightjar, tree pipit, willow warbler, lesser redpoll, redstart, pied flycatcher, wood warbler, and lesser spotted woodpecker.

We’re felling most of the coniferous trees whilst saving and protecting key native trees. The area will be re planted with oak and birch trees to develop new upland oak woodland, with woody shrubs like hazel, blackthorn, alder, willow and rowan. We’ll also be identifying key micro habitats, wet areas and flushes to protect the birds and enable them to thrive.

… The work at North America will complement our management in Langsett woods where veteran trees have been identified, native trees have been planted and wetland habitats have been created.


There was a monster sleeping in the plantation, hidden amongst the trees. See it?

’Twas a big, bad forestry forwarder (a John Deere 1410D Eco III, in fact). This beast transports all the logs cut from the felled trees to a stacking area where they can be loaded onto a lorry and taken away for processing.

A whole load of razor stop or birch polypore (Piptoporus betulinus) brackets jutting from a dead downy birch (Betula pubescens) stem.

Here a living downy birch grows beneath a canopy of larch. Are they for the chop too?

Just upstream of where the Porter or Little Don River enters Langsett Reservoir at its most westerly point, I took this photo looking over the tree-tops from Brookhouse Bridge. Golden light and creeping shadows.

As I neared the end of my walk the Sun had almost set, but with its last golden rays it illuminated the lower stems of a group of Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) in a resplendent display of aesthetic magnificence. Two days after I took this photo – another perfect autumn evening - I rode around Langsett on my bike and just so happened to be passing by these same trees at near enough the exact same time (almost as if I’d planned it or sommat). I was lucky enough to be granted an encore.

Twilight over Langsett.


* * * * *

An early autumn evening walk around Langsett (Part One)
An early autumn evening walk around Langsett (Part Two)


Posted in Gone for a walk










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