8 posts tagged with

gorse

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A glorious Indian summer: Five familiar friends

A familiar rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) on Whitwell Moor.

The weathermen forecast a startlingly hot few days last week – 25°C for the end of September in Sheffield certainly made me open my eyes – so I took measures to make the most of this unexpected resurgence of summer by taking a couple of days off work. Instead of sweating buckets trapped in a pair of chainsaw trousers, I was out roaming the moors and woods having a whale of a time. Wednesday was incredible but Thursday was truly the epitome of an autumn day; it’s just a shame that the sun sets so much earlier now than it did in the height of summer.

A familiar downy birch (Betula pubescens) of extraordinary girth, also on Whitwell Moor…

…and growing beneath its spreading branches, this little bolete (some kind of Leccinum, I think).

Hallo! It’s the famous Lonely Oak!

Last year I couldn’t find any acorns on the L.O., but there were a few on one side of the crown last week. I confess I collected some. Perhaps there will be a treeblog Set E next year?

One of my acorns. The Lonely Oak is an English or pedunculate oak (Quercus robur), so the acorns are attached to the tree on little stems.

Looking north from the ‘back’ of the L.O. towards Hunshelf Bank. Looking over its shoulders?

A familiar pair of Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) between the Salter Hills.

Chilled-out cows in the next field.

The eastern Salter Hill, complete with solitary hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna).

Gorse (or furze or whin: Ulex europaeus) - one yellow drop in the ocean.


Posted in Gone for a walk





A walk in the snow (2nd February 2009): Part Two

Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) to the left of me, European larch (Larix decidua) to the right...

A row of most snowy beeches (Fagus sylvatica).

In the heart of Millstones Wood...

Out in the fields, the snow was drifting behind the walls. Walking along a footpath hidden beneath this drift, I was ploughing through waist-high snow in places. It was either that or slide down a gorse-covered hill! The wind blowing through the gaps in the dry stone wall was sculpting fantastic shapes – this and the next photograph have been altered to highlight these.

More snow-sculpture. The oft-mentioned Millstones Wood can be seen in the left half of the background.

Near Ewden Height, and the snow was coming thick and fast. The bush in the foreground is gorse (Ulex europaeus) – a.k.a. whin or furze.

Millstones Wood again. Beech, beech, and more beech.


Posted in Gone for a walk





A walk in Millstones Wood (4th June 2008)

big blue sky and a wood in the distance

Walking up Long Lane to Millstones Wood you pass by two small woods on Whitwell Moor. This is the second.

leaves and the remains of flowers

These are parts of a tree I've seldom seen in Millstones Wood. I think it's a crab apple (Malus sylvestris), but I'm not certain. Can anybody ID this for me?

beech leaves overhead

Little sunlight penetrates the beech canopy. A typical characteristic of the average beechwood is a shady floor.

beech trees

Beeches. The many-branched beech to the left was probably grazed as a sapling which prevented it from growing with a single main stem.

strange carving in bark

Not sure what this is supposed to symbolise, or if it's just pure art, but I found it carved into one of the trees.

male pine inflorescence with whorl of needles

A male inflorescence and accompanying whorl of needles on a Scots pine.

close-up of female pine flower

The female flower of a Scots pine, only a few millimetres in height. In a couple of years this small red blob will have matured into a hard, woody pine cone. treeblog has already done a post on Scots pine reproductive organs (about this time last year).

stunted pines

Stunted pines on the top of the hill, just outside of the wood. Although I think only pines can be seen in this photo, there is at least one larch in the group.

Peak District landscape

From the vantage point beneath this pine, enjoy the view in the general direction of Sheffield and take in some of the Peak District landscape typical to my local area. In the foreground is a field of strangely neat gorse.


Posted in Gone for a walk





Duddingston Loch (26th April 2008)

Being free at last from the bonds of dissertation, yesterday I took a walk in the sunny afternoon to Duddingston Loch, only about ten minutes from my flat.

yellow sea of gorse

The yellow sea of gorse covering the foot of Arthur's Seat near Samson's Ribs.

willow and water

This willow grows at the bottom of a rocky slope, right on the shore of Duddingston Loch.

small hawthorn

A few stunted hawthorns are growing on the rocky slope...

new leaves on hawthorn

... and they are well advanced in putting out their new leaves relative to most deciduous species. Other early flusher I've noticed in Edinburgh include elder, gean, rowan, and certain silver birches and European beeches. The earliest flusher in town is probably the horse chestnut.

lichens on rock

Oooh, look: a token lichen photograph! One of the hawthorns can be seen in the background.

willow branches silhouetted against the sun

Dead and living branches of the willow silhouetted against Sol.

yellow gorse flowers

Let's end with a stunning gorse photograph. Doesn't it make you long for summer?

treeblog Set B update (Day 44 - yesterday) According to my father there are still no signs of life in the treeblog seed trays, except for something in the downy birch section that looks like a pine needle or blade of grass - probably a weed.


Posted in Gone for a walk





Marcescent oak leaves in Holyrood Park revisited

Back on the 14th of December I had a wee wander in Holyrood Park and bumped into a couple of young oaks. One was standing naked, but the other was covered in marcescent leaves. I wrote in this post "These dead leaves will probably spend the whole winter attached to the tree. I'll see if I can remember to go back and check in a month or two." Well, I did remember. And the leaves are still there.

marcescent oak on 14th December 2007

The marcescent oak as it stood on the 14th of December 2007.

the same oak on the 18th of February 2008

The same oak today, the 18th of February 2008. Most of its leaves still remain.

oak with no leaves

Its buddy is still starkers, obviously. The orangey blur in the centre of the photo is the marcescent oak in the background.

close-up of a marcescent oak leaf

Detail of one of the marcescent leaves.

gorse flowers

A bit of gorse. Gorse can flower at any time of the year!

pine needles and cones

There is a little bit of a pine wood growing right in the middle of Holyrood Park. I'm guessing it's all Scots pine.

alder silhouetted above Arthur's Seat

There were a few juvenile alder trees knocking about near the pines. At least one was old enough to reproduce - notice the seed cones and pollen catkins dangling from this branch silhouetted above Arthur's Seat.


Posted in Gone for a walk





Blackford Hill gallivanting (3rd May 2007)

young sycamore leaves

Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) - flower and new leaves.

young sycamore leaves - backlit

Young sycamore leaves backlit by the Sun.

early elder inflorescence

Early elder (a.k.a. elderberry) (Sambucus nigra) inflorescence.

young sycamore leaves

The young leaves of a small sycamore which was decapitated when a patch of gorse was cleared. The sycamore is a lot quicker off the mark in terms of recovery, by the look of things.

gorse shieldbug

The gorse shieldbug (Piezodorus lituratus). Tenuous tree link: feeds on gorse, which is almost a tree. A wannabe tree.


Posted in Gone for a walk





Wild cherry and gorse (30th April 2007)

wild cherry flowers

Wild cherry (a.k.a. gean) (Prunus avium) flowers in the garden.

wild cherry in blossom

Wild cherry blossom.

gorse with Arthur's Seat in background

Gorse in flower, with Arthur's Seat in the background.


Posted in Gone for a walk





A walk on Blackford Hill (27th April 2007)

horse chestnut inflorescence

Close-up of a horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) inflorescence.

gorse flowers

Vivid gorse (Ulex europaeus) flowers. I know gorse isn't technically a tree, but it can grow fairly big, woody trunks!

elm leaves

Some species of elm of which I am not quite sure - probably wych elm (Ulmus glabra.

elm bark

The bark of a close-by elm of the same species growing on a rocky substrate. Quite a big one; must have avoided Dutch elm disease.


Posted in Gone for a walk





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